Songs of Love and War

Monteverdi

purchase tickets online by Entering promo code: songs

 

NEW! Announcing an annual event at Portland Opera:
Winter Vino e Voce!

We invite you into our home for something unique and intimate. Enjoy a complimentary glass of wine and an introduction talk with General Director Christopher Mattaliano before each performance.

For this inaugural winter event in our very intimate studio theater, Portland Opera will feature an evening of vignettes that are just what you need to heat up a cold winter evening. Claudio Monteverdi—the first great genius of opera composers—wrote a series of madrigals that are some of the most sensual music ever created. These solos, duets, trios, and quartets are lyrical, expressive music that touch on seduction, passion, betrayal, and sensual pleasure. Let yourself get swept away by the sheer beauty and lyricism of this early Italian master composer!

EVENING Performances:

6:30pm – 7pm: Pre-show talk with Christopher Mattaliano
7pm – 7:30pm: Complimentary wine served
7:30pm: Performance of Songs of Love and War
Post-show talk with Christopher Mattaliano, creative team, and performers

Matinee (AUDIO DESCRIBED) Performance:

1pm – 1:30pm: Pre-show talk with Christopher Mattaliano
1:30pm – 2pm: Complimentary wine served
2pm: Performance of Songs of Love and War
Post-show talk with Christopher Mattaliano, creative team, and performers

Sung in Italian with English texts projected above the stage.

The running time is approximately one hour and twenty minutes.
No intermission or late seating—performances will start promptly.

Please note that parking at the Hampton Opera Center is limited. We encourage you to consider public transportation to performances. The Hampton Opera Center is next to the OMSI/SE Water station which includes Portland Streetcar, TriMet buses, and MAX light rail service.

*Monteverdi’s Songs of Love and War is not part of the five show subscription package. Additional purchase required.

purchase tickets online by Entering promo code: songs

 

Wine has been generously provided by:

love & squalor
Soléna Estate
Westrey Wine Company

These copyrighted images may only be used for editorial purposes promoting the Portland Opera and must include photographer credits: © Cory Weaver/Portland Opera

Cast

Soprano Soloist
Lindsay Ohse

Soprano Soloist
Antonia Tamer

Mezzo-Soprano Soloist
Kate Farrar

Tenor Soloist
Aaron Short

Bass Soloist
James Harrington

Baritone Soloist
Ryan Thorn

 

Director
Christopher Mattaliano

Conductor
Nicholas Fox

Costume Designer
Christine Richardson

Lighting Designer
Jonathan Bearclaw Hart

Plot & Program Notes

Winter Vino e Voce, is a new annual winter offering of intimate performances at the Hampton Opera Center, a spark of light in February for opera lovers. Offered in Portland Opera’s home, Winter Vino e Voce’s inaugural performance will showcase Claudio Monteverdi, the first great genius of opera composers.

In 1607 Claudio Monteverdi—the first great genius of opera composers—at the age of 40 wrote the earliest opera that is still in regular production, L’Orfeo. In addition to his great operas, Monteverdi also composed 9 books of madrigals, which are essentially “song books” that contain a series of vocal solos, duets, trios, quartets and other ensembles. The Portland Opera’s production of Songs of Love and War is a collection of tuneful and lyrical madrigals presented as mini-stories. These solos, duets, trios, and quartets are lyrical, expressive music based on poetry that uses the metaphor of war to describe love.

“For this production, I have chosen to stage a series of madrigals from Books 7, 8 and 9,” says General Director Christopher Mattaliano who will direct. “The poetry in these songs is surprisingly ‘modern’ in viewpoint, covering a wide range of emotion and content: the dance of courtship, sensual attraction, sexual passion, unrequited love, betrayal, lovers at war, and the tension between chastity and sensual pleasure. Think Carmina Burana, only much earlier.”

While there is no “story,” per se, to the evening, each song tells it’s own mini-story. The evening will feel like a series of staged scenes or vignettes – a woman laments about her lover’s betrayal, a duet with a man attempting (comically) to seduce a woman, a trio with three men pleading with their lovers to stop fighting, etc. In Monteverdi’s lyric, deeply expressive, and emotionally direct Songs of Love and War, the birth of opera as we know it is right around the corner.